Museums in Los Angeles

Top 3 Museums In Los Angeles You Must Visit

According to Wikipedia “Los Angeles may be a sprawling Southern California city and therefore the center of the nation’s film and tv industry. Near its iconic Hollywood sign, studios like Paramount Pictures, Universal, and Warner Brothers offer behind-the-scenes tours. On Hollywood Boulevard, TCL Chinese Theatre displays celebrities’ hand- and footprints, the Walk of Fame honors thousands of luminaries and vendors sell maps to stars’ homes.”

You will love to know this is an alphabetical list of over 250+ museums in Los Angeles and surrounding communities in Los Angeles County. So, you could plan for a trip to your next vacation in Los Angeles.

No matter how good the weather, visiting L.A.’s museums is important. Among the city’s best things to try to, l. a. museums rival those in Chicago, Washington D.C., and New York—without a doubt. Committing to each day inside a museum might pose a tough undertaking. Because Skim through the must-visit MUSEUMS & GALLERIES in Los Angeles and you’ll notice a trend: It’s a lot of outdoorsy fun.

Just plan your day trip wisely and you’ll be hopping about with ease. With its fragrant botanical gardens and state-of-the-art stargazing facilities, Los Angeles offers more to travelers than just its sun-soaked beaches.

Discover these three must-see Los Angeles museums:

LA’s thriving art scene is arguably one of the most exciting cultural beats of the city. From the booming downtown LA Arts District filled with colorful street art to award-winning architectural designs, Los Angeles is a city bursting with talented artists and interesting museums that span all forms of art.

Best 3 Museums In Los Angeles

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Though LACMA is currently closed, you can still snag your streetlight selfies in front of Chris Burden’s Urban Light. In addition, Michael Heizer’s teetering boulder Levitated Mass is still viewable, as well.

Chris Burden’s Urban Light, a bit made from 202 cast-iron street lamps gathered from around L.A. and restored to working order, has quickly become one of the city’s indelible landmarks over the past decade—and it’s inevitably what most visitors will identity the museum with.

But you’d be selling yourself short if you don’t venture beyond the photo-friendly installation; LACMA’s collections boast modernist masterpieces, large-scale contemporary works (including Richard Serra’s massive swirling sculpture and Burden’s buzzing, a hypnotic tangle of toy cars in Metropolis II), traditional Japanese screens and by far L.A.’s most consistently terrific special exhibitions.

As for the art itself, you’ll see contemporary titans like Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, and local artist Ed Ruscha in BCAM.

Getty Center

What’s now called the Getty Villa served because of the decades-long home for the J. Paul Getty Trust’s extensive art collection. But in 1997, the Getty Center opened. The end result’s an interesting complex of travertine and white metal-clad pavilions that houses ornate French furniture, recognizable Impressionist pieces, and rotating exhibitions.

Its relative inaccessibility is more than compensated for by free admission and panoramic views, from the hills and the ocean in the west all the way around to Downtown in the east.

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The bustling cafe by the entrance, as well as another one near the Central Garden, should suffice for most visitors, while the Restaurant (reservations recommended) provides sit-down service for a more leisurely, luxurious meal. We’d opt for the casual offering; if you want to go with the most casual option, pack a picnic and lay out a blanket on the museum’s sloping, south-facing lawn.

Huntington Library, Art Collections & Botanical Gardens

Almost all garden areas are open, but galleries, indoor spaces, and high-touch areas just like the children’s garden remain closed (with a planned reopening within the fall). You’ll get to wear a mask and undergo a temperature screening at the door.

To accommodate the lower capacity, the Huntington will now be open on Tuesdays and offer select evening hours throughout July and August. And, maybe even better, the museum’s free days aren’t going anywhere—in fact, the Huntington is planning two free days (up from the only day it typically offers) in July.

 

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